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Introducing Amieth—one of the stars of BBC Junior Doctors

20 January 2012

The first episode of the new BBC documentary series Junior Doctors: Your Life In Their Hands airs on BBC3 at 9pm next Tuesday 24 January.

346-amieth.jpgThe first episode of the new BBC documentary series Junior Doctors: Your Life In Their Hands airs on BBC3 at 9pm next Tuesday 24 January.

Set at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, it is the first of six programmes which follow the lives of eight junior doctors at work and at home as they adjust to taking the giant leap from medical school to working in some of our busiest and most challenging wards.

Filming took place over four months from the beginning of August to the end of November last year.

We spoke to Amieth Yogarajah, 27, from North West London, who is one of the doctors who agreed to take part in the series.

Why did you decide to take part in the documentary?

My mum always complains that she never sees me or hears from me, that she barely knows what I get up to, and that I’m never free to chat when she calls. I thought this way I don’t need to make any extra effort and she’d get to see me every week.

What were your first impressions of the hospital?

Very disappointed: it looked all glitzy when I walked in, with nice sculptures and artwork, but I needed to go to the top floor so I had to use those dreadful lifts. Mine stopped at every floor and that ghastly robot woman kept nagging me to gel my hands.

Where have you been working since you joined the Trust on 1 August?

A&E exclusively. I still don’t know where anything else is in the hospital because I work in such a small bubble.

What has been your best experience working here?

Meeting some friendly people in A&E.

And your worst?

Losing most of my weekends and working very changeable shift times makes it difficult to get into any sort of routine.

Has anything surprised you?

So far (touch wood) I haven’t turned up too early or too late for my shifts. Since these times change pretty much every day, that’s no mean feat!

What have you learned in the last three months?

I’ve gained more experience, really, with dealing with whatever comes in through the door, and I’m better able to decide what to do more quickly.

How has it been having the cameras following you at work and at home?

I think the A&E staff have largely welcomed the cameras and not been too unhappy having them around, and that certainly made it a more positive experience than it might have been. But it was sometimes quite tiring being filmed all day, going home and then having another camera and more interviews in the house.

More information about Junior Doctors: Your Life In Their Hands