Patient governors

Juliet Bauer

What do you do?
I was a patient of Chelsea and Westminster for a 6 month period in 2015 and this year also became a new patient governor. I have lived in the area for most of my life and am married with two daughters. I have worked in digital product development and communications for the last fifteen years, for The Times and Health Service Journal among others. I gained my MBA from Columbia in New York.

Why did you become a governor?
I am passionate about preparing the hospital for the next generation of patients. 

Tom Church

What do you do?
I am a lawyer working in the City, a community governor at Thomas Jones (an excellent state primary school in Ladbroke Grove) and, most important of all, a new father!

Why did you become a governor?
I live in the community served by Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and have benefited from excellent care as a regular patient at the hospital over the past decade—as have my wife and my young son. I want to use the skills I have gained in my professional career to help with the governance of Chelsea and Westminster at a time of enormous change in the provision of healthcare in London, change which brings both threats and opportunities for the Trust. In particular I want to ensure that, during this time of change, the impact on the patient experience is put at the centre of all decisions made by the Trust. I feel privileged to have this hospital in my community and want to give my time to help the Trust to maintain and indeed raise standards at the Chelsea and Westminster hospital and also in the other ways in which the Trust offers care to its community.

bio Christopher Digby BellChristopher Digby-Bell

What do you do?
I am an award winning lawyer, businessman and disability rights champion. I have won recognition for my work from UNICEF, Liberty, Justice and the Lord Chief Justice. My youngest son William is severely disabled so I understand the vital importance of good healthcare. I have been a trustee of charities like Scope and Contact a Family and a governor of a special school. I am a trustee of Victim Support and the Law Society Charity.

Why did you become a Governor?
I want to give back to the hospital to benefit its patients and staff. I understand the concerns of nurses having represented a nursing agency providing staff to the NHS. I intend to use my skill and experience as a lawyer to be an effective voice for patients.

Simon Dyer

What do you do?
My professional background is in Pharmacology and Medical Research. I was formerly Clinical Research Manager at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Senior Research Manager in the Directorate of Health & Social Care for London. For the last 13 years I have been working in the Department of Health and have more lately been responsible for a part of Emergency Preparedness in the Department.

Why did you become a governor?
I put myself forward as Patient Governor as I am a firm believer in the NHS being run by the people for the people and am a regular user of Chelsea and Westminster services, in the Kobler Centre. I am passionate in the drive to improve public health and improve healthcare when a visit to the hospital is necessary. I share the values of openness, honesty and integrity in my professional and personal life. 

anna-hodson-pressinger.jpgAnna Hodson-Pressinger

What do you do?
I am an Art Restorer/Conservator and also an Event Organiser. At the moment I'm doing a degree at London University.

Why did you become a governor?
As a Governor of the hospital I want to put my 10 years' experience of attending the monthly Patient Environment Action Team (PEAT) Board meetings to good use in terms of helping to improve the hospital. In addition, 10 years as my mother's carer while she was paralysed with many daily medical problems which brought her into Chelsea and Westminster Hospital have given me a huge wealth of personal knowledge and experience that will be very useful in helping me to fulfil my role as a patient representative on the Council of Governors to help enable the hospital to continue to excel.

Kush Kanodia

What do you do?
I am a social entrepreneur, who has developed a portfolio career helping a number of charities, social enterprises and non-profit organisations: Co-founder and Director of HeartsMap, a multinational social enterprise. Elected as a trustee for the charity Level Playing Field in the Houses of Parliament since 2012. Endorsed as a trustee for the charity AbilityNet since 2013, corporate trustees include Microsoft and IBM. Voted a trustee for Disability Rights UK in 2015, the largest pan disability charity in the UK. I have an MBA with Distinction and had the honour of being a Torch Bearer for the Paralympic Games in London 2012. Selected due to my dedication to disability rights and my ability to inspire. I have delivered speeches in Parliament and am a role model for government. 

Why did you become a governor?
I am a child of the NHS, whose father is a retired GP. A patient at Chelsea Westminster Foundation Trust Hospital since it was founded and have lived in the local area for the past 30 years. I am fortunate to have previously worked for the NHS as a Delivery Improvement and Transformational Change Consultant in London. Successfully completed the first Intersect programme 2014/15 by the NHS Leadership Academy. A new ground-breaking systems leadership programme which takes 40 of England’s most impressive cross sector leaders on a transformational journey towards realising their full leadership potential. I have an excellent understanding of the complexity, language and challenges the NHS faces in the current economic and political climate. I am therefore ideally placed to ensure maximum Quality of Care, Patient / Staff Satisfaction and value for money for our Trust as a Governor. 

Andreea Petre-Goncalves

What do you do?
I am currently leading the public affairs function of an international charity working to improve livestock health and welfare in developing countries. I am also a part-time PhD student and most importantly, a mum. 

Why did you become a governor?
I have a profound attachment to the Trust—my daughter owes her life to the enormously skilled and wonderfully compassionate staff at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. It therefore feels extremely meaningful for me to give something back. I am also concerned, like many others, about the multiple pressures that the NHS is forced to withstand, be it because of demographic change or political choices. It is an important time to be involved and to contribute and I am proud to do so for an NHS Trust where excellence is the norm. 

David Phillips

What do you do?
Many years in public relations and advertising. Now semi-retired and an associate lecturer at the University of the Arts, London.

Why did you become a governor?
Over the years I have received first class treatment at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. I have seen it expand into the excellent and patient-friendly hospital it is today. I am aware of the enormous financial pressures it is under like so many NHS trusts and the impact that can have on services. I am determined to see the high standard of patient care is maintained and where necessary, improved and that the hospital continues to provide an excellent service to patients in the widening community it serves.

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