Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

You are here: Home > About us > News > News archive > 2012 > 100 days to go to London 2012—meet our very own Olympic Gold medalist

100 days to go to London 2012—meet our very own Olympic Gold medalist

18 April 2012

Did you know that Chelsea and Westminster has its very own Olympic Gold medallist? Nuclear Medicine Superintendent Radiographer Adrian Ellison was part of the men’s rowing four which won a Gold medal at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics—we had a chat to him with find out more.

With 100 days to go until the opening ceremony for the London 2012 Olympics, we can reveal that Chelsea and Westminster has its very own Olympic Gold medallist.

Nuclear Medicine Superintendent Radiographer Adrian Ellison was part of the men’s rowing four including Sir Steve Redgrave which won a Gold medal at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

Adrian says: “My fondest memory of the whole Olympic experience from Los Angeles was feeling that I hadn’t let anyone down. I was coxing a crew of four huge, immensely powerful oarsmen (average height about 6 foot 4 inches and average weight about 15 stone) and over that summer we had all become good friends with infinite trust and respect for each other. My overwhelming feeling when we won was just relief that we’d done what we knew we were capable of and hadn’t disappointed our coach, Mike Spracklen, our families and friends who’d all supported us so much.

“This was back in the days before Lottery money supported international sportsmen and we had very limited financial backing from Sports Aid and sponsorship.”

Adrian recalls how the Gold medal was won: “In the final, we’d intended to jump into the lead and stay there for the whole 2,000 metre course, but the USA crew got their bows in front and stayed there until about 500 metres to go.

“I still remember the tone of desperation in the shout from our bowman, Martin Cross, when he called ‘500 to go—ready—GO!’ and something magical seemed to turn on a turbo charge of power. I’d been calling ‘I’m level with the American stroke’ for about 1,000 metres, and then suddenly I was saying “I’m on their three-man, I’m on their bowman, I’m on their cox” and then ‘We’re a canvas ahead, last 20 strokes’.”

Adrian says that no one recognises him or asks for his autograph anymore, but he hopes that one day his son will be proud of what his dad once did.